Non-Toxic Indoor/Outdoor Lounge Chairs

Bubble Club Chair

These polymer-based chairs can be used both indoors and outdoors. The Bubble Club Chair by Kartell (shown above), is made of non-toxic materials, and it has all its plastic parts printed with an identification mark to determine the correct recycling classification. It sells for $680. The Heller Mario Bellini MB1 Armchair (below) is constructed of one piece roto molded polymer, it sells for $450. It would also be good to see these chairs made with biopolymers.

Comments

  1. Aaron says

    That’s kinda ridiculous. These are very expensive and recycling makes a big difference for otherwise disposable items like bottles and bags and such. What difference does it make if a chair is recyclable? A good chair (CERTAINLY for this price) ought to last essentially permanently as a chair.

  2. Justin says

    Aaron,

    Give me a example of a comparable, less expensive non-toxic lounge chair, and I’ll believe you.

    Justin

  3. Aaron says

    Ok, I guess you’re right actually. I couldn’t find anything strictly “comparable” for much less. There are many options, including bamboo, that are non-toxic and less expensive, but not MUCH less expensive, and not strictly comparable. I still think that recycling a chair is silly because it ought to just be a permanent chair, but maybe if we take a very long-term perspective I might be wrong.

    Something about it still seems weird to me, the construction and price and all… but I don’t want to continue arguing about it. The more I think about it, the more I realize that wood or bamboo or other materials that I’d think were cheaper are probably treated in some way. Seems to me that those fold-able canvass and metal chairs are the best bet, but they aren’t strictly comparable, and I don’t know if we can find organic or otherwise strictly non-toxic cloth options. I guess I’d appreciate it if you happen to know about particularly eco-friendly canvass/metal fold-able outdoor chairs, that’d be a nice post. I suspect they’d be a lot more inexpensive and efficient than these plastic ones, but I admit they aren’t comparable totally.

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